Eagle Plate

March 24, 2009 11:08 AM | Alaskan Eagles

Eagle Plate

2007 Was a Banner Year for Auctions Hosted by R.m. Smythe & Co. With

Manhattan, New York – January 31, 2008 – R.M. Smythe & Co. held 6

auctions in 2007 offering historical autographs, currency, coins,

stocks, bonds, antiques and even two cannons. While compiling a list of

the more interesting lots that sold in 2007, the one unifying factor

that fits all of the items listed is that collectors were looking for

quality merchandise. This relentless search for quality became evident

in heavy bidding activity resulting in final bids that in many cases far

exceeded pre-auction estimates and set new auction records. Of

particular note was the December 12-13 sale #275 of part 13 of the

Schingoethe collection of obsolete currency, which saw many notes

selling for up to 10 times their presale estimates, with 94% of the 1162

lots sold at the final gavel (See http://www.news-antique.com/?id=783436

). Although interest in obsolete currency was very high, it represented

just a small portion of the antique and collectible merchandise that saw

very active bidding on the Smythe auction floor in 2007.

Here are realized prices on some of the more noteworthy lots sold by

R.M. Smythe & Company in 2007. The listed lots include the sale#, the

lot# and the final bid. In most cases the presale estimate is also

listed. The realized price listed does not include the buyers premium.

Detailed photos of each lot listed can be viewed by visiting the online

catalog for the specified sale# and lot# at Smythe auctions. See:

http://www.smytheonline.com/prices_realized/index.php .

Sale #270 – Lot# 1136 – Final Bid $24,000

1838 Die Alignment III, Reeded Edge Judd-84 Brilliant Proof. As a type

Gobrecht dollars are quite scarce, and when they are encountered, they

are usually from the 1836 mintage of 1,600 pieces. The Restrike Pattern

Gobrechts of 1838 (Judd-84) are considered to be R.5. This piece has

dark slate gray toning, but when rotated under light, very attractive

underlying hues of copper, gold, aqua, and blue can be seen. The proof

flash is very visible under the layers of color. Fully struck up, which

they are often not. The eagle’s feathers are quite distinct. Although

quite attractive, there are some of hairlines on the obverse fields

adjacent to Liberty, below STATES, and below the eagle. Not perfect, but

rare this nice.

Sale #270 – Lot#1219 – Final Bid $55,000

1911 Matte Proof NGC PR-66. There is no doubt that the double eagles

designed by Augustus St. Gaudens are the most beautiful coins struck by

the United States for general circulation. During this period of coinage

history, the US Mint was experimenting on ways to make our coinage more

artistic. One such way was the new process the Mint used to proof gold

coins, resulting in what we now refer to as “matte proofs.” They were

not well received by the public, and the low mintages for gold proofs

dropped further. The mintage for 1911 was a mere 100 pieces struck. This

coin is a picture perfect example of the Matte proof type. Pale yellow,

deeply struck and nearly flawless.

Sale #270 – Lot#1683 – Presale Estimate $15,000 and Up – Final Bid $21,000

New York Ch.E923. /Brooklyn. /First NB. $10. Fr.624. 1902 PB.

No.D765506/1 A. Choice-Gem Uncirculated. An incredibly rare serial

number 1 red seal Brooklyn that has not appeared publically since the

Kriegsberg sale in 1965. Totally original and in nearly perfect

condition except for some minor handling. The highlight of our National

offerings which promises to generate very aggressive bidding.

Sale #270 – Lot#3501 – Presale Estimate $25,000 and Up – Final Bid $30,000

$1000. A. T-1. Cr.1. No.129. PF-1. A crisp, bright, and remarkably vivid

example that until now has never appeared in any public sale. Its

existence was unknown to Criswell, Ball, Shull, or Fricke! VF or Better,

with seven light to moderate vertical folds. Neatly hammer cancelled,

with no pieces missing. Very boldly executed signatures of Clitherall

and Elmore. On the back are two lightly pencilled notations, stamp

hinges behind the cancellation, and an inconsequential water stain. None

of these are distracting, and they have no impact on the choice

appearance of the note when viewed from the front. Great eye appeal,

with brilliant green color, razor sharp black images and text, and ample

and even margins on all four sides. Strictly original , with no repairs

or “conservation” often encountered on Type 1 Confederate notes. This

is a note that would fit nicely into almost any museum quality

collection of CSA paper money. VF, CC. Ironically, the very first

Confederate paper money was engraved and printed by the National Bank

Note Company, in New York City. Shortly after the notes were ordered and

delivered, hostilities broke out at Fort Sumter, and Federal Marshals

moved in to the National Bank Note Company’s offices and confiscated the

printing plates. Of the 607 $1,000 Montgomery notes issued, 116 are

known, 9 in Uncirculated condition, and two of those are cancelled.

Perhaps a third of the survivors are virtually unobtainable, locked away

in public and private institutions. The $1,000 notes were signed by

Alexander B. Clitherall as Register and Edward Elmore as Treasurer. The

fiery Mr. Elmore was not a man to be trifled with. Mr. Daniels, the

publisher of a Richmond newspaper, wrote an article claiming that Elmore

was a heavy gambler who was embezzling large sums from the Treasury.

Elmore immediately challenged Daniels to a duel and shot him! This

extraordinary Criswell Type-1 has never been offered publicly or

recorded in any census, and it was probably collected decades before

Confederate paper money rareties were considered to be particularly

valuable. This may account for the fact that other than having been

carefully dismounted from the two stamp hinges that held it to an album

page, the note has never been tampered with in any way. Worthy of a

premium bid.

Sale #271- Lot#35 – Presale Estimate $5,500 and Up – Final Bid $6,500

British statesman, war-time Prime Minister and Nobel laureate

(1874-1965). Choice Typewritten Document Signed /”Winston L.S.

Churchill,”/ 1-1/5 pages, 4to, on parchment, London, January 18, 1957.

Churchill’s signature is penned at the conclusion [partially through

seal] and is witnessed by a solicitor. Bears embossed revenue stamp at

head. A / “Supplemental Agreement”/ to the existing book contract

between /”The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill

K.G., O.M., C.H., M.P. of Chartwell Westerham in the County of

Kent…and Cassell & Company Limited…in the City of London”/ amending

the existing agreement between them /”to the extent that the Publishers

shall despatch proofs of the Third and Fourth Volumes of ‘A History of

the English-Speaking Peoples’…as soon after the thirty-first day of

January one thousand nine hundred and fifty-seven as the printers can

provide them…Save as aforesaid the provisions of the Principal

Agreement shall remain in full force and effect…_”_/ In exceptionally

fine condition. Churchill’s four-volume work A History of the

English-Speaking Peoples was published between 1956 and 1958, and was

the last major literary work completed by him before his death in 1965.

This great work had a somewhat checkered life however. It was

commissioned by Newman Flower and the contract was signed in 1933.

Although Churchill continued to work on the manuscript, his public

duties did not enable him to complete the work by the outbreak of war in

1939; when he returned to his old post as First Lord of the Admiralty he

delivered 450,000 words to the publisher in the best shape he had been

able to give them, covering his subject from the beginnings to the

assassination of Abraham Lincoln. When, after the mighty events of the

next six years and the loss of the election of 1945, Sir Winston had the

time and the inclination once more to take up his pen, it was to the new

project, his Second World War, that he turned first. With these six

volumes happily completed, he was able to look again at the unfinished

History of the English-Speaking Peoples which had been laid aside in

such ominous circumstances so many years before. Churchill had recently

served his last term as Prime Minister [1951-55], during which time he

had been awarded the Nobel prize in literature [1953]. An extremely

scarce agreement between Churchill and his publisher covering one of his

most important works.

Sale #271 – Lot#159 – Presale Estimate $3,000 and Up – Final Bid $4250

NELSON, HORATIO British naval officer (1758-1805); in 1800, he blockaded

Malta and Naples, held by French and Neapolitan Jacobins; annulled

Cardinal Ruffo’s proposed terms to rebels, received absolute surrender;

restored Neapolitan royal family to power; became romantically involved

with Emma Hamilton, the wife of Naples consul Sir William Hamilton;

promoted Vice Admiral; created Duke of Bronte by Ferdinand I of Naples;

died in the battle of Trafalgar. Choice Manuscript Letter Signed

/”Nelson & Bronte” / as Vice Admiral of the Blue, 1 page, small 4to

[8-1/4″ x 8-1/2″], on his ship, the /HMS Victory, “Off Toulon, the 13th

August 1803.” / Addressing the /”Naval Storekeeper at Malta,” /Nelson

directs /”that you receive into His Majesty’s stores under your charge,

the Barge and Jolly (or four hand) Boat belonging to His Majesty’s Ship

Victory, and keep them under a Shade or Cover ’till they are wanted for

the use of the said Ship…” /Paper repairs at folds, minor stain at

top, otherwise in very good condition. Nelson had been given command of

the /Victory/ just three months earlier, and joined the ongoing blockade

of the French port of Toulon. However, the French fleet managed to slip

past the blockade in 1805, and Nelson led a failed pursuit. Retiring due

to ill health, he was recalled in September of that year, and fought his

great and final victory at Trafalgar just a month later. A good naval

letter, showing how control of Malta, achieved in 1800, allowed England

to maintain a fleet in the Mediterranean, a key to its dominance at sea.

Sale #271 – Lot#722 – Presale Estimate $3,000 to $3,500 – Final Bid $5500

OXFORD: OXONIA ILLUSTRATA “Oxonia Illustrata.” David Loggan. Oxford,

1675. Folio, red leather [by Bartlett?] with gilt cottage-roof design,

spine, six bands. Three engravings laid in. Minor dampstains and sparse

soiling, front free endpaper creased, front board slightly curled,

otherwise very good/fine.

Sale #272 – Lot#1263 – Presale Estimate $1,500 to $3,000 – Final Bid $8500

Central Bank of Brooklyn (NY) 1854. #199. 20 shs. Jolly old Saint

Nicholas rides in a sleigh full of toys, pulled by reindeer. A classic

vignette by Baldwin, Adams & Co. Durand Vignette Type III. Santa Claus

vignettes are some of the most sought after of all vignettes. The

Schingoethe collection of Santa Claus vignetted obsolete notes

established many record prices. First we have seen from this company. We

expect the bidding on this certificate to be quite competitive. Light

staining, left. VF.*

Sale #272 – Lot#4842 – Presale Estimate $7,000 to $8,000 – Final Bid $14,000

$20. Fr.953b. 1914. No.B2522533A. Choice Uncirculated. A real blazer Red

Seal $20 that looks perfect from the front and only the slightly askew

back centering keeps it from a Super Gem grade. The originality and

strong embossing are clearly visible through the PMG64 EPQ holder. A

marvelous note.

Sale #272 – Lot# 4938 – Presale Estimate $10,000 to $15,000 – Final Bid

$37,000

LT. Uncut 18-Subject Sheet of $5 1953 Legal Tender Notes.

A00000001A-A00136001A. The last note on the sheet bears the autographed

signatures of the Treasurer of the United States, Ivy Baker Priest, and

the Secretary of the Treasury, George M. Humphrey. Almost Uncirculated,

with some corner bends, and a trace of paper clip rust on the #1 note.

These are mentioned for accuracy, as you can never obtain a better

example of this unique sheet. Accompanied by a copy of a letter on

official Treasury Department letterhead, signed by Edward F. Bartelt,

Fiscal Assistant Secretary, dated May 20, 1953, certifying that this is

the first sheet of the first run of this series. A wonderful addition to

any great collection of U.S small size currency.

Sale #272 – Lot#2501- Presale Estimate $25,000 and Up – Final Bid $52,500

$1000. A. T-1. Cr.1. No.88. PF-1. John C. Calhoun, states-rights

advocate, left. Andrew Jackson, right. A crisp, bright, and remarkably

vivid example that was purchased in 1987 from our auction of Dr. Douglas

Ball’s personal collection. Described by Dr. Ball as “EF, plus, cut

cancelled.”

According to the 1987 description, on the back there were two lightly

pencilled notations, stamp hinges behind the cancellation, and an

inconsequential water stain, but these have all been professionally

removed. Hauntingly attractive, with the full eye appeal of an

Uncirculated example. The cancellations were done so neatly that they

are virtually undetectable from the front, and the paper quality is just

extraordinary. No folds are apparent. The signature of Clitherall is

boldly executed. The Elmore signature is a bit lighter. This is a note

that would fit nicely into almost any museum quality collection of CSA

paper money. Ex Phillip H. Chase, Dr. Douglas Ball, and Frederick Mayer.

You can’t ask for a more impressive provenance! Far superior to the one

we just sold in our April 2007 Western Reserve Historical Society Sale,

described as ” VF, CC” which brought $30,000. VF, CC. Ironically, the

very first Confederate paper money was engraved and printed by the

National Bank Note Company, in New York City. Shortly after the notes

were ordered and delivered, hostilities broke out at Fort Sumter, and

Federal Marshals moved in to the National Bank Note Company’s offices

and confiscated the printing plates.The $1,000 notes were signed by

Alexander B. Clitherall as Register and Edward Elmore as Treasurer. The

fiery Mr. Elmore was not a man to be trifled with. Mr. Daniels, the

publisher of a Richmond newspaper, wrote an article claiming that Elmore

was a heavy gambler who was embezzling large sums from the Treasury.

Elmore immediately challenged Daniels to a duel and shot him! Of the 607

$1,000 Montgomery notes issued, Approximately 116 are known, 9 in

Uncirculated condition, and two of those are cancelled. Perhaps a third

of the survivors are virtually unobtainable, locked away in public and

private institutions.

Sale # 272 – Lot#2521 – Presale Estimate $7,500 to $15,000 Final Bid $19,000

Act of February 28, 1861. $1000. Cr.Unlisted. B-8. Hand drawn mockup,

with pasted on proof vignettes on red silk fiber paper, with hand drawn

coupons. Wagon load of cotton. Sailor bottom. American Bank Note. Top

right panel separated. Vignettes loose. Worthy of some restoration. Has

the appearance of VF. Apparently the work on this bond started later

than the $500. The firm got the text of the bond, had it written in by a

scribe and then stuck in vignettes as appropriate. An important unique

and historical

Sale #274 – Lot#1595 – Final Bid $13,000

Colombia. 8 Escudo, 1779NR JJ. Carol(us) III. KM 50.1. (NGC MS-64).

obv.: Armored bust, facing right. rev.: Crowned arms in collar of the

Golden Fleece. Slight lamination on cheek, and rubbed forehead away from

Gem.

Sale #274 – Lot#1616 – Final Bid $9500

18th Century Spanish Bronze Breech Loaded Cannon. Typical form, 39 1/2″

in length. Bourbon arms of Charles III on top of barrel. Breach fired

cannon with breech block present. Minor damage to pindle. Nice surfaces

with only traces of verdigris. One of only 40 cannons that were reported

on the /El Cazador. /The fact that the breech block is present is simply

amazing. Cannon weighs 200+ pounds. Must be picked up-no shipping available.

“As you can see, 2007 was a great year for Smythe.” said Mary Herzog,

Vice President of R. M. Smythe & Co. “We had some exceptionally high

quality consignments, which resulted in a great deal of bidder interest.

For 2008 we’ve got some wonderful auctions planned and our customer can

expect even more quality merchandise on our auction floor.”

Accredited media interested in scheduling an interview to discuss this

release or past or upcoming auctions are encouraged to contact Mary

Herzog at 212-943-1880

About R. M. Smythe & Co.

R. M. Smythe and Co., established in 1880, buys, sells, and auctions

coins, paper money, stocks and bonds and autographs at their corporate

headquarters at 2 Rector Street in the heart of the Financial District

in New York City. To order a catalog, to contact any of the firm’s

specialists, or to make general inquiries, call 212-943-1880 or

800-622-1880, or visit the firm’s website at: http://www.smytheonline.com.

About the Author

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